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Mental Baseball Tip:How to play with anger

There will come a day as a baseball player when you feel as though nothing is working. No matter what adjustments you have made, advice you have taken, and rituals you have started, success just seems like its not coming any time soon.

You’re not the first baseball player this has happened to, and you certainly won’t be the last. When everything seems to not be working- there really is only one thing left to do.

Get angry.

Seriously. I mean get mad. You have worked too hard, and have sacrificed way to much to be just an average ball player. It’s time to take a stand. Your going to take back what once was yours.

And this is how you will do it.

So today you are 0-4 with three strike outs and a fly-out. You’re up to bat again. This is what will do.

Picture someone who has undermined or underestimated you. Someone who thinks your just an average ball player or blew you off unnecessarily. Maybe a coach, scout, team-mate or opponent. Visualize their expression as they see you fail. You were doing nothing but proving they were right. Imagine this in detail and allow this idea to stew for a bit until your blood begins to boil.

Are you getting angry yet?

Good.

Now step in the box and take this anger that you have gathered within you and transfer it to your bat.

You have just become the most dangerous player alive.

Remember you have had enough. You weren’t born to fail, you were born to succeed. You may have failed 1,000 times but not this time. This time, you are going to hit the ball hard. You are going to prove that you are a player not to be reckoned with. You are going to play fearlessly, and with reckless abandon.

When you get your chance…swing- then run as hard as you can.

I do consider anger to be a negative emotion, but used the right way it can provide some positive results.

Anger is like fire. If used correctly it can cook your food, warm your house, and provide light in the darkness.

If mishandled, like many players do, it can burn everything around you and leave you with nothing. So use this power wisely!

If you are a baseball player, and you have had enough…..get angry!

Don’t have a game for a while. Try using anger with these hitting drills!

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How to play and make baseball adjustments quicker

It’s an accepted ideology that being an effective baseball player comes down to making adjustments. Whether they be physical, mental, or emotional ones. A player will do well to understand this fact, learn what they can from it, and apply what they have learned as soon a possible, before it’s too late. The need to make an adjustment comes down to facing a problem or obstacle. For example, the problem may be that you are having trouble hitting the off-speed pitch. You may be experiencing hitting higher velocities as a challenging obstacle.
You can either find a way to push through this problem, or find a way around it. Either way doing so will cause you to make an adjustment. The important part to realize is that as a person we have to experience some sort of transformation before we can make an adjustment or find a solution to this problem.
“Problems can’t be solved at the same level of awareness that created them.” -Albert Einstein.
Making the adjustment really comes down to two things.

Focus and Expectations

Focus

What you focus on expands. If you find yourself in pain from a cut and I hit your toe with a hammer, you will probably forget all about the pain from the cut and have more focus on the toe right?

When trying to make an adjustment it’s the same. The problem is a player’s focus is on something that will not help them in making an adjustment. For instance, if a hitter has just struck out and his focus is on his batting average, or on what the scouts may be writing in their reports, his focus is entirely in the wrong place, and he probably won’t be making any productive adjustments at this point.

On the other hand, after striking out, his focus is on what he did wrong, what he could of done differently, majority of the time, his instincts will take over and his intuition will tell him what he needs to do to be successful in his next at-bat.

That’s true focus.

Expectations

With great expectations comes great disappointment. Don’t get me wrong, having great expectations for yourself is fantastic, but the game of baseball owes you absolutely nothing, and if you think just because you spent an extra couple of hours in the batting cage last week, you should be hitting .380, or since there are scouts in the stands that have come here just to see “little ol you” play- that you should be lighting up that radar gun, or making web gems.

Sorry, if you have played this game for more than one season, you know that nothing is for certain, and baseball will do whatever it can to knock you down, to see how you will react.

Do yourself a favor and throw away all your expectations, and just except the fact that nothing is written in stone. The moment you do this, the more empowered you will be. Trust me. Having this as part of your daily approach to baseball will allow you to play each game as your last. You will have the focus and discipline to play each game, pitch by pitch, inning by inning. This is how the big boys do it. The best players play each game like it’s opening day. Not worried about numbers, or their performance.

They’re in the moment.

So to will you be………

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Baseball Hitters Mentality

Know what the difference between hitting .250 and .300 is? It’s 25 hits. 25 hits in 500 at bats is 50 points, okay? There’s 6 months in a season, that’s about 25 weeks. That means if you get just one extra flare a week – just one – a gorp… you get a groundball, you get a ground-ball with eyes… you get a dying quail, just one more dying quail a week… and you’re in Yankee Stadium.

— Crash Davis

 

Playing great baseball is about doing the little things right. Taking advantage of every opportunity to become successful. As a baseball player, if you want to become a better hitter, someone who is consistent and able to stand out among other players there are plenty of things you can do.

Fortunately, if you are a baseball parent and you’re not quit sure what advice you can give him, there are plenty of resources to use. Including here;)

Apart from having sound physical mechanics, being a good hitter has a lot to do with the value you bring to the line-up. Do you get on base? Can you drive runners in? Or do you strike-out a lot while leaving runners on base. Do you find yourself ending the inning with the last out more than others?

All it takes is a few simple minor adjustments to turn things around.

Have a” get on base” mentality

A lot of players think that what truly matters offensively is there ability to get a “base it”. To an extent this is true but is only one half of the coin.Being young and not truly understanding the true value of each at-bat may force a player to take simply getting on base for granted. You have to have the mentality that, “No matter what, I’m going to get on base”! This comes down to knowing the situation, what your capabilities are as well as your opponents.

Getting a base hit is great, but a walk, hit by pitch or even an error is just as valuable. It may not help you batting average wise but it will help your team win.

Have a “Put the ball in play” mentality

No doubt about it, a strike-out has absolutely no value what so ever. Unless you battled and had a 10 pitch at-bat, saw all his pitches, and made him work hard to get you out, strike outs have no value.

You could have done the best hitting drills and have developed the quickest bat speed, but if you don’t put the ball in play. It’s worthless.

When I was in high-school I would call this the “Bull Dog Mentality”. I wasn’t sure if I was going to get a hit but by god, I wasn’t going to let the guy strike me out. And they rarely did.

Having a “refuse to strike out mentality” opens the door to a lot of good  things for the offensive team because it forces the pitcher to throw more pitches, puts pressure on the defense, and allows for your team to get to the bull pen. The pitchers in the bull-pen are there for a reason. They’re not as good as the starter.

Have a “Its about the process” mentality

Its very easy to get attached to results in this game. As a baseball player gets older, he may become more aware of stats and tangible results that show his value compared to others. Nothing will ever be more important to understand than the truth that this game doesn’t need to be played  in order to show us we are successful. If you can show up every game, give it your all and leave everything on the field, then you are already a success. No statistic, coach, or fan can ever tell you other wise.

Baseball is not about the destination. It’s about the journey. Think of each at-bat as an adventure and you can’t go wrong.

You are your own hero. When you come up to the plate, remind yourself of this. Forget about succeeding. Focus on being the best ball player you can be from moment to moment, and leave everything else up to the universe!

Good luck!!!!